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Post-Impressionism Marked a Turning Point to Modern Art

post-impressionism

Post-Impressionism is an art movement characterized by vivid colors, the depiction of real-life subject matter, and an abstract quality to art. Post-Impressionism was a cohesive movement led by Henri Matisse, Georges Seurat, and Vincent van Gogh. The movement was a reaction to Impressionism, which typically focused on painting landscapes and still lives.

Post-Impressionism looks like?

Post Impressionism is categorized under realist art as it focuses on realistic depictions of everyday life. Post-impressionist artists will typically use vivid colors in their paintings and concentrate on representing form, structure to painting, and painting approach.

The style of post-impressionism is also a reaction to the impressionist movement of the 19th century. Impressionists focused on light, color, and detail when depicting subjects, which created an abstract quality to their paintings. Post-impressionists didn’t agree with this approach and chose to represent subjects in their full realism with a more conceptual approach to the composition of a painting.

Another reason for the use of post-impressionism is the size of the paintings. Post-impressionist artists chose to create much larger paintings than impressionists, allowing them to develop their subject matter thoroughly. The term post-impressionism was first used in 1910 by art critic Roger Fry.  

Artists Influenced by Post-Impressionism

Many artists were influenced by post-impressionism, but some of the most notable include:  

  1. Paul Cézanne – an artist from France who used large, distorted figures to create scenes of his subjects in a unique and highly abstract way. 
  2. Henri Matisse – one of the most influential artists of the 20th century, Matisse experimented with color and design to create bold, abstract compositions.  
  3. Georges Seurat – an artist from France who used tiny dots of color to create vibrant and bold paintings.

Artistic license overlap

Artists like van Gogh, Seurat, and Paul Gauguin contributed a great deal to the movement. They were heavily influenced by the natural world and depicted things like sunlight, water, or farm animals accurately. The style they used to represent these things was called pointillism.

Pointillism is a painting technique where artists use small dots of color to create an image’s impression. You may have seen this painting style before if you’ve ever seen a pointillist painting of a landscape. If you look closely at a pointillist painting, you can see that each tiny dot of color.

Pointillism was an excellent way for artists to add depth to their paintings. If you look at a painting by Seurat, you’ll see that his paintings are very colorful. In addition to using bright colors, Seurat also used pointillism to create the impression of an image. 

Seurat’s most famous painting is called “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.” It was painted in 1884 and is made up of thousands of tiny dots of color. It’s an excellent example of pointillism.

Similar yet distinct from Impressionism

The style of post-impressionism is also a reaction to the impressionist movement of the 19th century. Impressionists focused on light, color, and detail when depicting subjects, which created an abstract quality to their paintings.

Post-impressionists didn’t agree with this approach and chose to represent subjects in their full realism with a more abstract approach to the composition of a painting.